2022

Research Seminar Series (02/2022)

"Understanding Critical Data Governance"

Speaker: Dr Preeti Raghunath, Monash University Malaysia

Date:       Tuesday, 17 May 2022

Time:       12.00pm

Venue:    The seminar will be conducted via Zoom (zoom link will be forwarded to the registrants). For registration, please click the link here.

Contact person: Ms. Sharmaine Loh

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Speaker’s Profile

Preeti Raghunath is a Lecturer (Communication and Media Studies) at the School of Arts and Social Sciences, Monash University, Malaysia. She is the author of ‘Community Radio Policies in South Asia: A Deliberative Policy Ecology Approach’, published by Palgrave Macmillan, in 2020. As such, her work has focused on the interlinkages between media technologies, and associated policies and their making, historically and in present times, placing people at the centre. She currently serves as a Vice-Chair of the Global Media Policy Working Group of the International Association for Media and Communication Research (IAMCR). Her current research interests lie in data policies and practices in India.

Abstract

This paper is an effort in outlining and positioning a point of inquiry called Critical Data Governance (CDG), to theoretically study data policies and practices. Over the last half a decade, growing datafication across the world has been accompanied by academic research that present critical perspectives to this phenomenon, under the rubric of Critical Data Studies. All the same, we have the now-established body of interdisciplinary work called Critical Policy Studies. Bringing these two areas of research in conversation with each other, I argue for a critical approach to the study of data governance, in an effort to go beyond the managerial, instrumental and technocratic approach that seems to be more common today. I do this by drawing on policy experiences in the South(s), to showcase how such a critical approach to data governance can be rooted in addressing decolonial aspirations and be informed by Southern theorising.

Research Seminar Series (01/2022)

"A Tale of Triple Disadvantages: Coping with Disabilities and Poverty in Rural Java, Indonesia"

Speaker: Dr Dyah Pitaloka, Monash University Malaysia

Date:       Tuesday, 1 March 2022

Time:       12.00pm

Venue:    The seminar will be conducted via Zoom (zoom link will be forwarded to the registrants). For registration, please click the link here.

Contact person: Ms. Eswary Sivalingam (logistics) and Associate Professor Emma Baulch (academic matters).

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Speaker’s Profile

Dyah’s research explores issues related to marginalisation in contemporary healthcare, narrative in digital health, development & global health policy, and ICT for social change. They are looking at how cultural meanings are negotiated and co-constructed by community members in their interactions with various social, structural, educational, economic, religious, and policy contexts that surround their lives. This current project was funded by the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) under “Just Tech COVID-19 Rapid Response Grant.”

Abstract

The covid-19 pandemic has reinforced social inequality in marginalized groups. People with disability are particularly restricted in their activities and lives due to the pandemic and experiencing more difficulties than the general population. The high poverty rate, a lack of robust infrastructure, limited access to communication and technology, and access to the economy make the impacts of the pandemic are falling disproportionately on this particular group. In rural and remote communities, these challenges are more amplified. Poverty, disability and rurality create acute challenges for those living in rural areas. Participants' responses to COVID-19, are revolved around the internal and external structure that formed their interactions within themselves (intra), with others (inter), and with the larger social communities and the environment. Findings reveal that health, economic and political dimension of the pandemic and its policy did not spare people with disabilities from structural exclusion.